Underrated Tourist Spots – Shirakawa-Go, Japan

Underrated tourist spots Shirakawa-go Japan

Underrated Tourist Spots – Shirakawa-Go, Japan | Japan is not famous for preserving historic buildings. But there are exceptions. The villages of Shirakawa-gō and Gokayama are a Japanese UNESCO World Heritage Site. These villages are known for their houses constructed in the architectural style “gasshō-zukuri” (合掌造り, prayer-hands construction) Outstanding feature: thatched and steeply slanting roofs

Underrated Tourist Spots – Bibury, England

Underrated Tourist Spots Bibury England

Underrated Tourist Spots – Bibury, England | This spot is featured on the inside cover of all United Kingdom passports! Bibury is not just a village in Gloucestershire. It is a nationally notable architectural conservation area of the UK. Located on both banks of the River Coln, the village recently became a major destination for

Underrated Tourist Spots – Popeye Village, Malta

Underrated tourist spots Popeye village Malta

Underrated Tourist Spots – Popeye Village, Malta | Popeye Village – also known as Sweethaven Village – has never been a real village. It was built in 1979, and it’s just a group of 19 ramshackle wooden buildings located at Anchor Bay in Malta. That’s 2 miles away from a real village called Melliena. Popeye Village

Underrated Tourist Spots – Meteora, Greece

Hidden and Underrated Tourist spots Underrated tourist spots Meteora Greece

Underrated Tourist Spots – Meteora, Greece | Today’s blog post is all about Meteora – spectacular rock formations topped with Greek Orthodox monasteries. ‘Metéora’ means “middle of the sky”. And that really nails it. A formation of immense monolithic pillars and hills-like huge rounded boulders dominates the reason half way between Thessaloniki and Athens. Some

Underrated Tourist Spots – Eze, France

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Underrated Tourist Spots – Eze, France | A location made for movies. And in fact Walt Disney stayed here several times. The area surrounding Èze was already populated around 2000 BC. Eze was subsequently occupied by Romans, Arabs and by William of Provence. An Egyptian cross inside the church of Èze suggests the village’s ancient roots,