Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude

Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude
Sod Roof in immediate need of repair. Photo by Roede. Own work, wikipedia CC

Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude | Green roofs may be a new phenomenon elsewhere, but in Norway people have been planting gras and flowers atop their houses for a few hundred years already. Lush green on the roof just happens to keep a house better insulated. There are obvious advantages such as maintaining regular temperatures within the dwellings and stabilizing the houses themselves. Only sometimes things get out of control. Let’s take a look at this instafamous snapshot of a rotten cottage with trees on its roof near Hemsedal, Norway. Pinned and re-pinned some 100,000 times, none of the pins actually reveals its exact location. But at least some sources pointed towards Hemsedal. For us this hint was enough evidence to search for it. We drove up Rv52 and once we passed Hemsedal, the object of desire appears on our left. Here you go: 60.873483° N, 8.495333° E. The house seems to be in immediate need of repair. Otherwise those trees will soon destroy the sod roof.

Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude
60.873483° N, 8.495333° E

Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude Trees on roof cottage Hemsedal Norway
Trees on roof cottage Hemsedal Norway
Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude
Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude
Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude
Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude

Would a ride from Oslo to Hemsedal be worth the effort just for this photo? Probably not. But Hemsedal is situated half way between Norway’s Capital and Bergen – a major coastal tourist magnet. And Hemsedal got more, especially in winter: it represents Norway’s second largest ski resort. In 2000, the Ski centres in Hemsedal and Grøndalen were bought by the Swedish company Sälenstjärnen, now renamed to Skistar.

Hemsedal is a village with approx. 1,900 inhabitants in Norway’s Buskerud county and part of the Hallingdal region. It can be reached via Norwegian National Road 52 (Rv 52). The village is located 220 km / 136.70 miles northwest of Oslo.

Traditionally it was an agricultural region. Today, tourism is the no. 1 business in Hemsedal. One of the first tourists was the Norwegian polar explorer Fritjof Nansen, who visited Hemsedal in 1898 and stayed at the Bjøberg Fjellstue. Skogstad Hotell, the first hotel in the village, was established in 1905. Hemsedal Skisenter opened in 1961. The first chairlift, Olaheisen, opened in 1983. Since then tourism has continued to grow in economic significance. About 50% of visitors come from abroad. More recently Hemsedal also became a bit more popular in summer, due to opportunities for fishing, hiking, climbing, cycling and golf. About 70% of all visitors come in the winter season (December–May) and most of the remaining 30% in summer.

10 facts Norway pick a destination
Norway | Pick your destination.

Getting back to green roofs: It is quite easy throughout Scandinavia to spot house covered with turf. Some are bright green and almost velvety. Others are golden and look like they’re growing wheat or oats. A number of turf roofs have flowers mixed in with the grass, and a few have small trees. You find some amazing examples right here -> Scandinavia’s Green Roofed Homes.

Roofs in Scandinavia have been covered with birch bark and sod since prehistory. During the Viking Ages most houses had sod roofs. In rural areas sod roofs were almost universal until the beginning of the 18th century. Tile roofs, which appeared much earlier in towns, gradually superseded sod roofs except in some remote areas during the 19th century. Corrugated iron and other industrial materials became a threat to this ancient green roofing tradition. Just before “extinction”, romantics proclaimed a revival of sod roofs. A new market was opened by the demand for mountain lodges and holiday homes. Sod roofs have begun to reappear.


Cabin with Tree Rooftop Latitude Longitude. By Chili & Churp | © International Destinations | Visit our Travel Alphabet.